Most Popular Trading Mistakes in Commodity And Equity Markets

Most Popular Trading Mistakes in Commodity And Equity Markets
1. Trading for excitement & thrill Not for profits.
Many traders consider the stock market as casino and trade for thrill and fun only. As soon as one has a losing trade, he wants to quickly make back the lost money. He thinks about the other things he could have done with the money, regret taking the trade and want to recover as quickly as possible. This, in turn, leads to further mistakes. Be patient and wait for the next high probability opportunity. Don’t rush back in.
2. Trading with a high ego.
Many individuals who have remained highly successful in other business ventures have failed miserably in the trading game. Because they have a fairly big ego and thought they couldn’t fail. Their egos become their downfall because they can not except that they would be wrong and refuse to get out of bad trades. Once again, whoever or wherever has anyone come from does not concern the markets. All the charm, powers of persuasion, number of degrees & diplomas of business management on the wall or business savvy will not budge the market when you are wrong.
3. Three 4-letter words that will kill you! HOPE–WISH–FEAR–PRAY
If you ever find yourself doing one or more of the above while in a trade then you are in big trouble! Markets have own system of moving up & down. All the hoping, wishing and praying or being fearful in the world is not going to turn a losing trade into a winning one. When you are wrong just use a simple 4-letter word to correct the situation-GET OUT!
4. Trading with money you can’t afford to lose.
One of the greatest obstacles to successful trading is using money that you really can’t afford to lose. Examples of this would be money that is supposed to be used in any other business, money to be paid for college/school fee, trading with borrowed money etc. Ultimately what happens is that when someone knows in the back of their mind that they are risking the money they can not afford to lose, they trade out of fear and emotion versus logic and no emotion. If you are in this situation It highly recommends that you stop trading until you earn enough to put into an account that you truly can afford to lose without causing major financial setbacks.
5. No Trading Plan
If you consider yourself a trader, ask yourself these questions: Do I have a set of rules that tell me what to buy, when to buy and how much to buy, not just for the next trade, but for the next 10 trades? Before I enter a trade, do I know when I will take profits? Do I know when I will get out if I am wrong? These questions form the first part of a trading strategy. There simply cannot be any expectation of success if we can’t answer these questions clearly and concisely.
6. Spending profits before you make them.
Nothing is more exciting than getting into a trade that blasts off and puts you into a highly profitable situation. This can cause major problems, however, because this type of trade puts you in a highly euphoric state and leads to daydreaming about the huge profits still to come. The real problem occurs as you get caught up in the daydream and expectations. This causes you to not be prepared to get out as the market reverses and wipes off all your profits because you have convinced yourself of the eventual outcome and will deny the reality of the situation. The simple remedy for this is to know where and how you will take profits once you enter the trade.
7. Not Cutting Losses or letting Profits run
One of the most common mistakes made by traders is that they let their losses grow too large. Nobody likes to take a loss, but failing to take a small loss early will often result in being forced to take a large loss later. A great trader is not someone who has never had a loss. Great traders have made many losses. But what makes them great is their ability to recover quickly from a string of losses.
Every trader needs to develop a method for getting out of losing trades quickly. Research and learn to apply the best methods for placing protective stoploss orders.
The only way to recover from many (small) losing trades is to make sure the winning trades are much larger. After a series of losing trades, it becomes difficult to hold a winning trade because we fear that it will also turn into a loss. Let your profitable trades run. Give them room to move and give them time to move.
8. Not Sticking to your plans & Changing strategies during market hours
If you find yourself changing your strategy during the day while the markets are still open, be mindful of the fact that you are likely to be subject to emotional reactions of fear and greed. With rare exception, the most prudent thing to do is to plan your trading strategy before the market opens and then strictly stick to it during trading hours.
9. Not knowing how to get out of a losing trade.
It’s amazing that most of the traders don’t have any clear escape plan for getting out of a bad trade. Once again they hope, pray wish and rationalize their position. It must be kept in mind that market does not care what you think. It does what it does and when you are wrong you are wrong! The easiest way to keep a bad trade from going really bad is to determine before you get in, where you will get out.
10. Falling in love with a stock (Just Flirt).
Many traders get fascinated by just a stock or two and look for opportunities to trade in those stocks only ignoring the other profitable trading opportunities. It is because they have simply fallen in love with a stock to trade with. Such tendencies can be suicidal as for as trading is concerned. It may cost any one dearly.

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Do and don'ts for Stock Market Investments

Do and don'ts for Stock Market Investments

Do and don'ts for Stock Market Investments

What must I do now?
This is the question probably every equity investor would have asked himself a number of times in the past few months.
With the stock market moving to dizzying heights before succumbing to gravity, it’s easy to get nervous or over-excited.
Here’s what we suggest you do when the bulls and bears kick up a lot of dust.
What you must NOT do
1. Don’t panic
The market is volatile. Accept that. It will keep fluctuating. Don’t panic.
If the prices of your shares have plummeted, there is no reason to want to get rid of them in a hurry. Stay invested if nothing fundamental about your company has changed.
Ditto with your mutual fund. Does the Net Asset Value deep dipping and then rising slightly? Hold on. Don’t sell unnecessarily.
2. Don’t make huge investments
When the market dips, go ahead and buy some stocks. But don’t invest huge amounts. Pick up the shares in stages.
Keep some money aside and zero in on a few companies you believe in.
When the market dips –buy them. When the market dips again, , you can pick up some more. Keep buying the shares periodically.
Everyone knows that they should buy when the market has reached its lowest and sell the shares when the market peaks. But the fact remains, no one can time the market.
It is impossible for an individual to state when the share price has reached rock bottom. Instead, buy shares over a period of time; this way, you will average your costs.
Pick a few stocks and invest in them gradually.
Ditto with a mutual fund. Invest small amounts gradually via a Systematic Investment Plan. Here, you invest a fixed amount every month into your fund and you get units allocated to you.
3. Don’t chase performance
A stock does not become a good buy simply because its price has been rising phenomenally. Once investors start selling, the price will drop drastically.
Ditto with a mutual fund. Every fund will show a great return in the current bull run. That does not make it a good fund. Track the performance of the fund over a bull and bear market; only then make your choice.
4. Don’t ignore expenses
When you buy and sell shares, you will have to pay a brokerage fee and a Securities Transaction Tax. This could nip into your profits especially if you are selling for small gains (where the price of the stock has risen by a few rupees).
With mutual funds, if you have already paid an entry load, then you most probably won’t have to pay an exit load. Entry loads and exit loads are fees levied on the Net Asset Value (price of a unit of a fund). Entry load is levied when you buy units and an exit load when you sell them.
If you sell your shares of equity funds within a year of buying, you end up paying a short-term capital gains tax of 10% on your profit. If you sell after a year, you pay no tax (long-term capital gains tax is nil).
What you MUST do
1. Get rid of the junk
Any shares you bought but no longer want to keep? If they are showing a profit, you could consider selling them. Even if they are not going to give you a substantial profit, it is time to dump them and utilize the money elsewhere if you no longer believe in them.
Similarly with a dud fund; sell the units and deploy the money in a more fruitful investment.
2. Diversify
Don’t just buy stocks in one sector. Make sure you are invested in stocks of various sectors.
Also, when you look at your total equity investments, don’t just look at stocks. Look at equity funds as well.
To balance your equity investments, put a portion of your investments in fixed income instruments like the Public Provident Fund, post office deposits, bonds and National Savings Certificates.
If you have none of these or very little investment in these, consider a balanced fund or a debt fund.
3. Believe in your investment
Don’t invest in shares based on a tip, no matter who gives it to you.
Tread cautiously. Invest in stocks you truly believe in. Look at the fundamentals. Analyse the company and ask yourself if you want to be part of it.
Are you happy with the way a particular fund manager manages his fund and the objective of the fund? If yes, consider investing in it.
4. Stick to your strategy
If you decided you only want 60% of all your investments in equity, don’t over-exceed that limit because the stock market has been delivering great returns.
Stick to your allocation.

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